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Let's Liberate the Simple

Your first name is Free...Last name is Dom.


Lately, I've been a bit obsessed with the second paragraph on page 7 of The Secret. Byron provides four specifics we will learn of in the book. Today, I'd like to focus on the first one. You are about to read of the fantastic passage of the Fair People, who, like Man, arrived on the shores of the New World with dreams of freedom and contentment. So, the Fair Folk dreamt of freedom and happiness. Also, take note of the book's dedication. Are we overlooking hints to a constant across these puzzles? Do we need to hone in on freedom and what would make the Fair Folk happy? Perhaps a reminder of their homeland?


Over the years, several people have speculated about ties to the 1976 Bicentennial - the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It doesn't hurt to look at the solved puzzles to see if there is evidence of freedom in the burial area or along the path.


Chicago - We have the obvious - Grant, Lincoln, and even Roosevelt(famous four freedoms speech) but what about the 1909 Illinois Supreme Court decision, declaring Grant Park, Forever Open, Clear, and Free? Cleveland - The painting hints to a very specific path to the park from Terminal Tower. If you move from Terminal Tower on the southwest side of the square to the entrance of Euclid Ave(think geometry), you'll be standing under a towering monument. Atop the monument, the Goddess of Freedom holding the Shield of Liberty. Continue east on Euclid Ave till you hit Liberty Ave.(now MLK Jr. Dr.) which takes you north into the park.


Boston - The verse calls out - In truth, be free. We have a quote from Longfellow referencing Paul Revere's(a member of The Sons of Liberty) famous ride. How about the Freedom Trail?


Let's stop here for now. It does appear the puzzles where casques have been retrieved integrate both freedom and the Fair Folk's heritage. I have thoughts on the rest but people always want to discuss the "solved" puzzles first. Feel free to reach out if you'd like to discuss or hear more on the topic. In closing, I always like to ask the question, is this too vague for a theory/method? Could you drop a casque anywhere and find ties to heritage and freedom? I'm not sure I can answer the question. It's not like I am basing an entire method on trees and rectangles so why not give it some thought?


Mind, use your power...Spirit, use your wings.

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woodford
woodford
2022年7月27日

Not only was Cleveland on Liberty Ave, but that section was called “Liberty Row” and dedicated to soldiers of WW1.


Rows and columns in the verse, Liberty Row on site. Euclid + Freedom


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Mo Jo
Mo Jo
2022年7月27日

Freedom is a given based on above excerpt from book. What should be honed in on is how each paired painting and verse validate each site in a manner that shows their historical significance in some way shape or form

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Mo Jo
Mo Jo
2022年7月28日
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Sure Chris. Take Boston for example. It seems pretty clear the verse speaks of how Boston was the site for a historically significant event in the making of America. In addition, Mr. Palencar uses his skills to pepper the painting with his artistic clues.

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woodford
woodford
2022年7月27日

the freedom insight is huge. it ties together so many elements of the puzzle that we have been dancing around but unable to pinpoint.


a healthy dose of Americana is really going to push the puzzle forward

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And don't forget the two "coastal paintings"… The first painting has a prison window in rocks, evoking one of the most famous prisons of the USA: Alcatraz. (The corresponding verse says that the casque is "kept"… in prison?) The last painting has the face of the Statue of Liberty. Maybe we can interpret that as "from prison to liberty"?

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Fenix
Fenix
2022年7月27日
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Are you reading my notes? ;) If we think about the yin/yang of the SF painting, freedom would be prison's mate. As far as NYC goes, Liberty may just point to a different Liberty all together. Ave Maria! haha The above is how I interpret those two but I do like the coastal painting thought. There's certainly more across the other puzzles. For anyone familiar with the Sifting and Winnowing tie to Mitchell Hall in Milwaukee...academic freedom? Roanoke is quite simple. Augustine had the theory of free will. How about Montreal, could salvation be considered freedom?

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