top of page

Just a quick pheather scratch of delight

I love thinking on verse/image matches. I don't know about the rest of you, but it seems to me there is no consistent methodology to Byron's process in this area. However, I do think the connections are intended to be made. (heck Roanoke Island all but confirms it)


Let's look at Houston.


Our [partial] Pierre quote gets us to Hermann Park. That's excellent alone, but what if this line was intended to build the whole puzzle? Maybe give us an image to use too?


What I and many have found interesting is that if we "go through a dictionary of quotations," the quote he's referencing goes on:

Seems this tower of delight could be caused by something as simple as watching a leaf. People have taken this to mean we're looking for another tree. Perhaps... [yawn]


Byron has amended this quote himself by saying our "[tower of delight] falls softly in December night." Hm... We can feel confident he intended for us to realize that the delight in question is a leaf because he preserved the verb "fall" from the original quote. Leaves certainly fall softly.


So this leaf falls at night?


Any images with a bunch of leaves? Maybe an overt night sky? Just one you say? And we already think it goes with this verse? Interesting...


(heck... maybe that night sky has a cross constellation in it that can only be seen from Texas and Florida?)


215 views6 comments

Recent Posts

See All

6 Comments


jaunathen
jaunathen
Oct 21, 2021

where does leafs falls un december ?!

Like
Fenix
Fenix
Nov 16, 2021
Replying to

I don't know. Where does leafs falls un december?!

Like

Fenix
Fenix
Sep 01, 2021

I love how you chose to look at the quote meaning differently. I've seen leaves, feathers, and snow referenced for over a decade but no great reason or explanation of them tying into the puzzle. Excellent thought. I do want to mention a couple things I rarely see discussed. 1. - The quoted passage is found in Book IV - Retrospective, section II. An interesting coincidence, when given, "In the center of four alike" and the acrostic "is two". 2. - The lines proceeding and following the Pierre quote seem relevant in context. The previous line, "As the vine flourishes, and the grape empurples close up to the very walls and muzzles of cannoned Ehrenbreitstein; so do the sweetest joys of…

Like

Nicely done. I’ve also always thought it referred to the leaf mentioned further in the quote but didn’t make all the connections you went on to make. Another great verse/image match for this set I believe is the “spout”/jinn and potentially “whistle” sound referring back to 982 but also echoed in the image by the train tracks.

Like

Collin McCarville
Collin McCarville
Aug 29, 2021

Could the "falls softly in December night" refer to snow falling? It matches the same "tower of delight" one gets from the falling of a leaf, hearing of a voice, and paper scratching. Just an idea. Thanks!

Like
phrabbott
phrabbott
Aug 29, 2021
Replying to

Sure could! Would be a great reason for December.

Like
bottom of page